Menu
Image 1 of
Zoom In
Zoom Out
Fullscreen

“CCC: A Young Man's Opportunity for Work Play Study & Health,” by Illinois WPA Art Project, Chicago, ca. 1935

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) recruited men aged 17 to 28. Based in camps around the country, the men planted trees, did fire abatement, improved roads and trails, drained swamps and restocked rivers. The Works Progress Administration (WPA), another New Deal agency, produced this poster to publicize the CCC.

Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress

  “CCC: A Young Man's Opportunity for Work Play Study & Health,” by Illinois WPA Art Project, Chicago, ca. 1935

Making Conservation Work

To combat the staggering unemployment of the Great Depression and preserve the nation’s natural resources, Congress created the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1933. Before its demise in 1942, the CCC employed more than three million young men on conservation projects in every state. The CCC was one of the most popular programs of the New Deal.