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Come to Mother—When Miss Rankin Came to Congress, drawing by Nina Allender, March 31, 1917

Nina Allender, the official cartoonist of the National Women’s Party, expressed suffragists’ hopes for attaining a woman suffrage amendment once Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana was elected to Congress. Allender depicted the voting rights amendment as a young girl (named after suffragist Susan B. Anthony) and Rankin as the woman who would look after her.

Courtesy of the National Woman’s Party at the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument

Come to Mother—When Miss Rankin Came to Congress, drawing by Nina Allender, March 31, 1917

The Nineteenth Amendment: Woman Suffrage

In 1916 Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana, a suffragist and pacifist, became the first woman elected to Congress. As a member of the House, Rankin pushed for woman suffrage, opening the first congressional debate ever held on the subject. Congress approved a constitutional amendment for woman suffrage in 1919. Ratified by three-fourths of the states, it became the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Rankin is also noted as the only member of Congress to have opposed U.S. participation in both World War I and World War II.

Is it not possible that the women of the country have something of value to give the Nation at this time? It would be strange indeed if the women of this country through all these years had not developed an intelligence, a feeling, a spiritual force peculiar to themselves, which they hold in readiness to give to the world.

Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana, Speech to the U.S. House of Representatives, January 10, 1918