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H.J. Res. 200, Joint Resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution . . . extending the right of suffrage to women (Nineteenth Amendment), January 8, 1918

The campaign for woman suffrage began in the 1840s. Three decades later, the first resolution for a constitutional amendment extending voting rights to women was introduced in Congress, but failed. The suffrage movement gained strength in the twentieth century, culminating with congressional approval of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1919 and its ratification by the states on August 26, 1920.

Records of the U.S. House of Representatives, National Archives and Records Administration

H.J. Res. 200, Joint Resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution . . . extending the right of suffrage to women (Nineteenth Amendment), January 8, 1918 H.J. Res. 200, Joint Resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution . . . extending the right of suffrage to women (Nineteenth Amendment), January 8, 1918

The Nineteenth Amendment: Woman Suffrage

In 1916 Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana, a suffragist and pacifist, became the first woman elected to Congress. As a member of the House, Rankin pushed for woman suffrage, opening the first congressional debate ever held on the subject. Congress approved a constitutional amendment for woman suffrage in 1919. Ratified by three-fourths of the states, it became the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Rankin is also noted as the only member of Congress to have opposed U.S. participation in both World War I and World War II.

Is it not possible that the women of the country have something of value to give the Nation at this time? It would be strange indeed if the women of this country through all these years had not developed an intelligence, a feeling, a spiritual force peculiar to themselves, which they hold in readiness to give to the world.

Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana, Speech to the U.S. House of Representatives, January 10, 1918