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Pass books from the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company for Ann Blue and Harrison Blue, Lexington, Kentucky, 1873

Ann Blue and Harrison Blue were among the tens of thousands of African Americans who put their money and faith in the Freedman’s Savings and Trust. The bank helped many freed African Americans establish a financial foothold, but when it failed in 1874 due in part to fraud, it left many depositors destitute and disillusioned.

Records of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, National Archives and Records Administration

Pass books from the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company for Ann Blue and Harrison Blue, Lexington, Kentucky, 1873 Pass books from the Freedman's Savings and Trust Company for Ann Blue and Harrison Blue, Lexington, Kentucky, 1873

The Freedmen's Bureau - 2

In 1865 Congress created the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, known as the Freedmen's Bureau, to provide for the needs of displaced and formerly enslaved persons. The Freedmen's Bureau provided humanitarian, educational, and legal services. It also supervised labor contracts and redistributed abandoned lands. Separately, Congress chartered the Freedman's Bank to encourage savings. Four African Americans elected to the House in the 19th century––Representatives John Mercer Langston, Jeremiah Haralson, Josiah Walls, and Robert C. De Large—had worked for the Freedmen's Bureau.