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Three envelopes with watercolor drawings, by Sergeant Samuel Lionel Boylston in the South Pacific, 1944

"Camp’s Big Office" 6/19/1944

"Guard the Egg" 9/30/1944

"Where are the Ships?" n.d.

Sam Boylston served in the South Pacific during World War II. An amateur artist, he illustrated envelopes for letters he and a buddy, Gerald Duquette, sent to loved ones. Boylston returned home in 1945 and attended college on the G. I. Bill. Gerald and Lillian Duquette donated sixty works by Boylston to the Veterans History Project.

Veteran’s History Project, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

Three envelopes with watercolor drawings, by Sergeant Samuel Lionel Boylston in the South Pacific, 1944 Three envelopes with watercolor drawings, by Sergeant Samuel Lionel Boylston in the South Pacific, 1944 Three envelopes with watercolor drawings, by Sergeant Samuel Lionel Boylston in the South Pacific, 1944

Educating Veterans, Preserving Their Stories

Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 22, 1944, the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act—better known as the GI Bill of Rights—guaranteed World War II veterans funds for college education and vocational training, unemployment insurance, and home loans. In 2000, Congress authorized the Veterans History Project. Based at the Library of Congress, it collects and preserves the stories of Americans who served in modern foreign wars and those who supported military endeavors on the home front.