Lying in State of Congressman Elijah E. Cummings

The public is invited to pay their respects to Representative Elijah E. Cummings Thursday, October 24 from 1 p.m. until 7 p.m. Please enter through the Capitol Visitor Center.

On Thursday, October 24, the Capitol Visitor Center will be closed for normal operations, and all Capitol tours are cancelled.

On Wednesday, October 23, the second floor of the Capitol will be closed to the public. The Capitol Visitor Center will offer modified tours of the Capitol.

If you have a tour reservation and would like to reschedule, please click here or contact the Visitor Services Office at (202)226-8000.

On Friday, October 25, the Capitol Visitor Center will reopen for normal operations and Capitol tours at 8:30 a.m.

Congress and the Separation of Powers

Congress and the Separation of Powers
Open through September 2018

Why does the U.S. Constitution separate the government into three branches? At the nation’s founding, the Constitution’s framers understood that executive, legislative, and judicial responsibilities differed, and they provided for these distinct functions. They also believed that concentrating authority in one body would result in tyranny. They therefore divided the government into legislative, executive, and judicial branches, so that no single part would become too strong, and empowered each to limit or “check” the powers of the others. This exhibit examines Congress’s unique role and the ways in which it can balance or dynamically shape and challenge the powers of other two branches.